Shut down oil wells in Culver City.

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Lily Ng about 1 month ago

The oil fields in Culver City are a visual blight. It's odd to have oil fields inside a city proper. Do the oil fields provide funds for the city itself? Is there a way to reclaim this space for public use and remove oil fields from land areas that could be better used for other purposes like parkland, hiking, conservation, biking, etc.

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Alisa Reich about 1 month ago

We are writing in support of the proposed amortization of capital investment in oil and gas production facilities in the Inglewood Oil Field in Culver City. We agree with the Oil Subcommittee’s call to halt non-conforming oil and gas related uses through an amortization program; to fix the time frame for phasing out oil and gas activity; and to remediate the area beginning in January 2021 for the purposes of protect public health, the environment and the city’s economy. Previous and current operators—not the citizens of city of Culver City—should be held responsible for all costs of well plugging, abandonment, and remediation of the site. These tasks must be done with a living wage compensation for trained, unionized and, ideally, local workers.

Residents and workers in Culver City—your constituents and taxpayers--should no longer be exposed to the health hazards and property value losses of proximity to the largest urban drilling fields in the nation. The Culver City City Council properly put the health and well-being of its citizens, the environment, and social justice over the interests of fossil fuel companies in. We encourage its leadership as it develops a plan to phase out oil operations and remediate the Culver City portion of the IOF starting in January 2021 according to its Capital Investment Amortization Study.

Culver City has the legal right to phase out non-conforming use of its land through urban oil drilling in January 2021, as agreed in the contract with the oil operator, Sentinel Peak Resources. Closure of the few wells will damage SPR little, but will vastly benefit residents of Culver City by removing damages to public health (increased nose bleeds, headaches, eye irritation, risk of COVID-19, asthma and respiratory illnesses, preterm births and high-risk pregnancies, and cancer) and to property values.

In addition, closing and remediating the City’s portion of the wells would create new jobs, and must be covered by the oil and gas operators, and not the city or taxpayers.

Finally, we have the backing of Sierra Club and many local environmental groups who will look to Culver City as a beacon for ecological sense and social justice.

Respectfully yours, Dr. Alisa Reich Professor Peter Reich, UCLA School of Law

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Emmanuel Alcantar about 1 month ago

California has always aimed to be a leader on environmental issues and Culver City should continue in that legacy. That is why I am writing in support of Culver City shutting down a portion of the oil field through amortization. Working class communities and communities of color are disproportionately affected by the health effects of pollution as a result of fossil fuel activities. As a working class person of color, I've experienced some of these very same health effects as a result of environmental racism. If Culver City wants to stand in solidarity with its Black and brown constituents, it must close the city's portion of both active and inactive oil wells.

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Wesley Chuang about 1 month ago

The discussion and negotiation period is over, fossil fuels has got to go. Stop betting on our children's future.

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Diane FletcherHoppe about 1 month ago

Please close the Inglewood Oil Fields. I live near by in the Oxford Triangle and suffer from Asthma. While the Playa Del Rey Field is closer, The Inglewood Field gasses do not know a limit to how far they travel. I know these gases are very harmful. The authorities also know. They just have to do the right thing.

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